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Nov 20, 2008

Is it just me?

I've seen the trailer for Doubt a lot lately. Looks good, but whatever.

I keep noticing the following scene, where Meryl Streep's EVIL NUN FROM HELL shows how cruel she is by removing an instrument of fun (or something) from a student's head. To wit:






Looks at first like an iPod, right?

Then, as she pulls the whole...device out, it looks maybe less like an iPod and more like a Walkman. Just one problem. Doubt is set in 1964. The original Walkman was released in 1979.

I showed this to my parents (who were in their twenties in 1964) and asked them if I was going crazy thinking that their was nothing like this at that time. Here's a closer look:


A transistor radio perhaps? Maybe, but they weren't portable (at least, not with headphones) in the 60s.

I want answers, people. I have serious...doubt as to the accuracy and integrity of this whole cockamamie production now.

The full trailer can be seen here.


13 people have chosen wisely: on "Is it just me?"

Mrs Fletch said...

They wanted you to have doubt, now you do! :)

Adam Ross said...

Ha! I love catches like this. I tried to do some research on earbud headphones, all Wikipedia says is that they became popular in the 1990s. My first experience with earbuds was with my first GameBoy in 1989. I have a hard time believing they were around in the early 60s, since those big ear cover headphones were popular in the 70s.

Robb said...

I saw Doubt on Broadway with Cherry Jones, and it was awe-some. I can forgive tech problems as long as Meryl Streep delivers some patented acting kick-assery.

Princess Fire and Music said...

I could easily be wrong, but I have a hard time believing that earbuds were around back then or, if they were, that a kid would have access to them. I don't recall seeing any until the early 2000's (and was slow to adapt myself; I was using regular headphones until two or three years ago).

I do want to see that movie now, though. It would be interesting if I could get my dad to see it with me -- he went to Catholic school in the 60's.

Fletch said...

Yeah, there's no way earbuds were around back then, and even if they were, they weren't for use with any portable device.

I just thought this was funny because I think it's the first time I've noticed a gaffe before I'd even seen the movie. After noticing that bit with the buds, I figured the film was set in the present; when I saw it wasn't, I went "Heyyyyy!!"

Pat said...

I can remember having a single earplug for a small transistor radio I had as a kind in the early '70s, which is what this scene reminded me of.

The Fraze said...

I just did an article on the play from which this film is adapted from - Streep and Hoffman are already in the running for Oscars this year based solely on the buzz - but obviously they're both amazing actors who no doubt can follow through the hype

tularosa said...

I remember hiding under the covers into the late night, listening to clear channel stations with my little transistor radio and earphone. It was a single wire, with a piece that fit into the ear. Actually fit my ears better than ear buds do now. This was about 1966.

karl said...

Tularosa has it right. Transistor radios were certainly portable in the 60s (haven't you ever seen Dr. Strangelove?) and the listening device was called an earphone -- it fit snugly into the aural cavity (wow, I never wrote that before) like an earplug and delivered hours of sensual pleasure.

tommy salami said...

It's a single earphone portable radio. Made since '57, whippersnapper.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transistor_radio

:)

Fletch said...

Yes, I offer a full mea culpa to the Doubt folks. See, this is why the internets are great. As Lloyd Christmas would say, "I guess they're right, old people, though slow and dangerous behind the wheel, can still serve a purpose. Don't you go dyin' on me!"

Thank you, old people. ;)

lisleman said...

I noticed two comments about the earbud in the 60's. I'll add a third. There were mono so just one and I recall they went into the ear canal a good distance. The small transistor radio was a big hit back then. I doubt anyone called them earbuds.